Luty, Andrew James

Luty, Andrew James

October 17th, 2016

It is with profound sadness the Luty family announces the passing of our patriarch Andrew James Luty on Monday, October 17th, 2016 surrounded by his family at University Hospital, London. Born in Zbaraz, Manitoba on May 15th, 1922 to Nicholas and Frances Luty, Andy was the eldest boy with seven siblings. Lovingly remembered and sadly missed by his wife of 66 years Mary, his devoted children: Jackie Regan (Charlie), Diane Luty, Connie McCabe (Patrick), Marlene Mackay (Darrell) and Christopher Luty (Deborah). Cherished 'Gigi' to his grandchildren: Colin, Elyse, Ryan, Chelsea, Brett, Ben, Breanna, Michael, Claire and Ethan; Great-Gigi to Andrew and Chase. Brother and dearest friend to Con (Belva) and lovingly remembered by many nieces, nephews and lifelong friends. Visitation will be held on Friday (their wedding anniversary!) from 2:00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at WESTVIEW FUNERAL CHAPEL, 709 Wonderland Road North, London, where the celebration of life will be held on Saturday, October 22nd, 2016 at 10:30 a.m. In keeping with Andy's wishes, a private entombment will follow at St. Peter's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make a donation are asked to consider a charity of your choice. Andy led a remarkable life and touched the lives of everyone he met. We will miss his immense presence, laughter, wise advice, card playing and generosity.

"Two long, one short, one long."

 

Andy’s Story

 Andy was born in Zbaraz, Manitoba to Ukrainian immigrant parents. He was the eldest boy with four older sisters and three younger brothers. He left the family farm at the age of 16 in search of employment and the dream of prosperity. With just a 4th grade education, he travelled to Kenora, Ontario where he worked in a logging camp piling 8’, 200 lb. train ties he cut from pine trees for the CNR… a challenge for a 135 lb. young man. Working the entire winter, he earned enough money to purchase an accordion, a clarinet and a saxophone for himself and two brothers. He recruited two neighbours and they formed a 5-piece band. They played at weddings and town hall dances for several years. During WWII, Andy enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces and trained to become a gunner with the Princess Patricia Light Infantry (PPCLI) Artillery Unit. After leaving the military, he returned to Winnipeg, Manitoba and worked as an auto body repair mechanic before becoming a Steam Locomotive Fireman for the CNR. After a week, he was laid off but had the option of transferring to Northern Ontario. Facing temperatures of 50 degrees below zero he had enough of the cold but was determined to stay with the CNR. In 1945, his decision to visit relatives in Toronto led him to transfer to the CN’s Southern Ontario Region, in London. After working as a Steam Locomotive Fireman, Andy moved into the role of Freight/Yard Engineer, and then his favourite role, an Engineer in the passenger service for the Windsor-London-Toronto corridor.

 In 1945, at a dance Andy met the love of his life. That smiling coat check girl named Mary charmed him with two little words, ”ticket please”. They married in 1950 and a family soon followed. In 1956 he purchased two boxcar loads of CN scrap lumber and began building his own home. He always whistled while he worked around the house (as long as things were going well!) and this prompted his eldest daughter Jackie to start whistling before she could talk. And 48 years later, his grandson Ethan started whistling at the age of three. As the five children grew and attended school, it encouraged him to complete his education. Andy worked a full time job and maintained several properties during the day and he successfully completed his elementary and high school education, at night school.

Always busy…either taking family trips or deer hunting (at least that’s what they called it) with his brothers and close friends. In the community, he volunteered as Local Chairman (London CNR Engineers Union). He served as President of the following organizations: Federal Riding of the London East Liberal Party, London Ukrainian Business & Professional Association and the M.C.C. 93. For 15 years he volunteered for the city Auxiliary Police. With his family of five small children living one mile from the nearest city bus stop, he became an advocate to bring bus service to his subdivision. After months of visiting many municipal government and transportation agencies, he finally succeeded. Andy retired from the CNR, at 62, but he was not ready to retire completely. He attended George Brown College, in Toronto, and successfully completed the Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Program.  He was hired by Ramada Inn, in Toronto, as an Air Conditioning Technician.

Andy & Mary loved the warm weather and thought it would be nice to find a family retreat in sunny Florida to escape the cold winter months. He enjoyed his time in Florida for 33 years with family and friends playing cards, golf, tennis, renovating the condo, shopping around for bargains, and volunteered at the local consignment shop.

Andy was one in a million…always making people laugh with his great sense of humour. 

We would like to thank University Hospital, Parkwood Hospital, doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, and support workers for their generous time and care. 

Our family would like to express their sincere thanks to all of the wonderful friends and family who travelled near and far to share their time, prayers, and thoughts with us and for your support during this difficult time.  We are most grateful to you and for your presence here today. May God Bless you all for sharing our sorrow.

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Book of Condolences

Dawn BoydOur deepest condolences go out to you and your family Chris, what a wonderful father you were blessed with.
Paul / Laura Pistor We will remember his zest for life, his unconditional love for family and his great sense of humour. He will be missed. Our condolences to the family.
Brother Con Brother Andy, You were my best friend for life Together we could build or fix anything, share a drink and joke or two and despite the problems that sometimes occurred, we could always look back and laugh at them as we got older, because those times always made for better stories. We raised two huge families, and always made time to get together,looking forward to each visit. You and I have seen our children struggle as well as succeed, we have watched our grandchildren grow and great grandchildren coming along as we aged ourselves' How can I sum up the memories of 91 years as brothers?? I can't. Talking to you always put a smile on my face and always looked forward to those calls. Thank you for all the memories Andy And when you are driving that Engine of God's train, make sure you don't spill the cup of water sitting on the window ledge. Love you brother and will miss you and now may you rest in peace. Con
Rod CowanAn absolute gentleman, generous host and wise man. My sincerest condolences to Christopher and family.
Shirley BarrSo sorry to hear about Andy. My thoughts are with you Mary and the rest of your family.
Christopher MurphyOn behalf of the Murphy family our deepest condolences to the Luty family. A great man, a great life, a great family.
Michael. and Tracey RuehleYou mentioned your dad as a pillar of strength and the reason you are who you are. Your dad was and will always be a great man! God bless you and all those tou love.
Krisanne KaloheretisOn behalf of the Kaloheretis/Giurleo families, our deepest condolences to the Mary, Diane and the entire Luty family. We will always remember smiling Andy around the pool at Castel. Krisanne, Nick, Alexis, Vanessa, Jimmy and Helen.
AileenUncle Andy: We couldn't wait for your annual visits out west. This always meant huge family gatherings with Baba and Gigi, along with many aunts, uncles and cousins. There would be food, drink, laughter and a lot of music. Always exaggerated stores, jokes, pranks and more laughter. Always East against the West when it came to hockey and football. I consider myself so very fortunate, to have experienced your love and warmth. Thank you for the many memories. Rest peacefully. My condolences to my London Luty family. We will all miss him.
Paula MouldOn behalf of the Mould family. we send our deepest condolences to your family. We know how much Andy was loved and cherished. How deeply his is missed. Out thoughts are with you at this time.
Bill and Mary Lou Nicholson We want to offer our sincere condolences to all the Luty family. Although we were not as close as we could have been, we were always impressed with Andy's outgoing personality and kindness to all.a
Angela, Martin & Tatianna MoolykMrs Luty, Jackie, Diane, Connie, Marlene, Chris & Family, Expressing our deepest sympathy to all of you on the passing of your beloved husband/father. I have many fond memories of Mr.Luty from our many visits to your house, gatherings and throughout the community. He always made me laugh & lifted you up when you were down. I also remember him always giving a hand when needed in person at our house or on the phone. He will be truly missed. Good bless you all. Vichnaya Pamyat
Cindy GelinashMy sincere condolences to the entire family. Andy will surely be missed, but his legacy lives on through those he leaves behind. A genuine person who always showed he cared.
Walter & Gail MamakDeepest sympathy to the Luty Family. So sorry for your loss.
Ruth HazelwoodMary, I was sorry to hear about Andy, my thoughts and prayers are with and your family.
Ray & ViSo many fond and loving memories, too numerous to list them all. Goes back to when our folks would get together in London, whoop it up for a few days and finish with a toast out on the driveway as part of the "good-bye until next time". Spent one summer working for Uncle Andy when he operated the apple orchid. While there remember your Dad teaching us auto body repair as we pounded out dents on the cab of a truck that I believe eventually found its way to Poplarfield. While Vi and I lived in Toronto and made the frequent weekend trips to London, your Dad used to fake great irritation at the tire marks we used to leave in the drive way on Dengate. Of course this usually resulted in repeat preformances. We remember the many music session with family in London as well as the marathon cribbage games of course enhanced with contents of the little silver kegs that were only available in Ontario. I only made it to one of the great hunting trips at Uncle Con's cottage but remember the commradiere as being so unbelievable close. Also had the opportunity to enjoy a few visits to the Florida home including a game of golf with your Dad & the alligators on a Venice golf course. These memories are only a few of the many we will retain forever. Thank you Uncle Andy. Rest in Peace
Sandra LutyUncle Andy Our families spent many vacations and holiday together. I remember Easters most vividly. I learned I need not ask “are we there yet?” because about 30 min before we would reach his home in London my dad, Con would start whistling happily. That was the sign of contentment that he was about to see his best friend soon. It was also at these visits where I learned that a stuffed bunny, some well placed Easter eggs and garlic sausage provided endless laughs. Same thing would happen when Andy was on his way to visit us as well. Dad would be whistling all day awaiting his arrival. I would smile just watching Uncle Andy pull out his wallet and open a folded piece of paper that we knew were his latest round of jokes he had written down or printed out. And oh that laugh! He had a laugh that would make you laugh, but also wonder what he was up to! I loved that laugh. Uncle Andy was such a hard worker and a talented craftsman. He and my dad worked on so many projects together. He built a chimney on our cottage with old reclaimed bricks. Such masonry work is no small feat and Dad proudly pointed it out to anyone who visited. That hard work resulted in big strong hands but when Uncle Andy rested a hand on your should when he greeted you it was never intimating but instead comforting and you instantly felt welcomed. I always felt as comfortable with Uncle Andy as I did my own father. So many adventures were shared in London, Ottawa, Cottage, Florida and trips out west as well. A large majority of my happy childhood memories include Uncle Andy, Aunt Mary and their amazing children whom, as the youngest of my generation, looked up to and admired more than they probably realized. Children who were kind, welcoming and of course funny were the result of two parents who passed on those wonderful traits to them. Uncle Andy and my dad showed me what a sibling relationship truly could and should be. Thank you for the good example and thank you for all your kind and loving words and letters over the years Uncle Andy. He always took time to write me a little note or letter in birthday cards or holiday cards. He always made me feel important. You will be missed deeply. I love you so much. Sandra
Maria and Randy BowdenChris and Debbie and to the entire Luty clan we send our Love to you all . From the Bowden and Pistor families we know how much you loved your dad and so we honour him at this time and say to him " job well done ...rest in beautiful peace" ....love Maria and Randy
Jim LutyI was fortunate to have several uncles, and although I cared for them all, the bond with Uncle Andy and family was especially close. I have so many fond memories of get-togethers with the Luty clan from London. When we were kids, every summer meant trips either for us to 44 Dengate, or the London Luty's coming up to the cottage. And it was a given that when we got together there would be antics by Uncle Andy and my Dad (his brother Con). Uncle Andy had a sharp sense of humour, and there was always a joke to be told or a prank to be played. He had a deep, mischievous laugh that was unforgettable. He had a presence that just made you feel comfortable. We always had a lot of fun when our families got together, whether it was pool parties in London or the Luty Olympics at the cottage. That closeness between brothers and their families is rare these days, and as we've grown and gone our separate ways I find myself missing those days of innocence. The self-taught skills of Uncle Andy and Dad were impressive, and if they didn't already know how to fix something they would figure it out. Fortunately some of that was passed on to the kids... whether we liked it or not. ;-) Uncle Andy was the kind of person that if there was a problem with one of the machines while he was in the hospital he would probably try to fix it. And if he couldn't he would tell them where they could find the cheapest parts. ;-) Uncle Andy has had a profound affect on my life, and I will miss him dearly.
Sandra Luty Our families spent many vacations and holiday together. I remember Easters most vividly. I learned I need not ask “are we there yet?” because about 30 min before we would reach his home in London my dad, Con would start whistling happily. That was the sign of contentment that he was about to see his best friend soon. It was also at these visits where I learned that a stuffed bunny, some well placed Easter eggs and garlic sausage provided endless laughs. Same thing would happen when Andy was on his way to visit us as well. Dad would be whistling all day awaiting his arrival. I would smile just watching Uncle Andy pull out his wallet and open a folded piece of paper that we knew were his latest round of jokes he had written down or printed out. And oh that laugh! He had a laugh that would make you laugh, but also wonder what he was up to! I loved that laugh. Uncle Andy was such a hard worker and a talented craftsman. He and my dad worked on so many projects together. He built a chimney on our cottage with old reclaimed bricks. Such masonry work is no small feat and Dad proudly pointed it out to anyone who visited. That hard work resulted in big strong hands but when Uncle Andy rested a hand on your should when he greeted you it was never intimating but instead comforting and you instantly felt welcomed. I always felt as comfortable with Uncle Andy as I did my own father. So many adventures were shared in London, Ottawa, Cottage, Florida and trips out west as well. A large majority of my happy childhood memories include Uncle Andy, Aunt Mary and their amazing children whom, as the youngest of my generation, looked up to and admired more than they probably realized. Children who were kind, welcoming and of course funny were the result of two parents who passed on those wonderful traits to them. Uncle Andy and my dad showed me what a sibling relationship truly could and should be. Thank you for the good example and thank you for all your kind and loving words and letters over the years Uncle Andy. He always took time to write me a little note or letter in birthday cards or holiday cards. He always made me feel important. You will be missed deeply. I love you so much. Sandra
Kevin & Marlies SuzukiOur condolences to all the Luty family. We'll miss seeing Andy at the annual movie night and picnic and at card night when we found out what a card shark he was!
Cheryl Anna Lane44 Dengate Crescent, London, Ontario, Canada, N5W 1V8. I see this address and am overwhelmed with memories of a home to whose visits I cherish. All of the smiles, laughter, teasing, games, jokes, helpfulness, teaching, learning, cooking, pranks, sharing, swimming, cards, putter golf, weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, eating, caring, friendship and especially, love for each other. Uncle Andy, I will always remember the twinkle in your eyes, warm smile, big hugs, taking me on a train ride, salty jokes, patience, energy, intelligence, generosity, decency, and kindness of heart. In short, a wonderful man. I love and miss you. Aunty Mary, Jackie, Diane, Connie, Marlene, Chris, Uncle Conn and your families, I am so very sorry. God bless, Cheryl Anna. xoxo
Mary Mentuch Paquin and David PaquinOur deepest condolences to Andy's family and friends. Andy was such a wonderful man and touched people in so many positive ways, he will deeply be missed. Andy always remembered the people in his life with such warmth and compassion and when something needed to be done he was there to help in any way he could. Andy always remembered our family, the Mentuch family in Toronto and when he visited us we always felt such a genuine warmth and caring. Andy was always very good to my parents... well, to everyone. That was Andy! Vicnaja Pamjat.
Brian Luty and familyWhen I think of my Uncle Andy, as many others have mentioned, I recall his sense of humor and that a joke or a prank could happen at any time. As a young man, when visiting London with a girlfriend, he could get my face (and hers) to turn red with a prank or a comment all in good fun. I also remember that if something was broken there was a wealth of assorted items in the garage or shed at Dengate Crescent and he could come up with something that would help fix the problem. When I was a co-op student at University of Waterloo I would often visit my “second family” in London. When I was doing my university work placements in Toronto and living in the Mentuch’s basement apartment in the west end and returning from visiting London, sometimes I would be on the same train that Uncle Andy was working on (after a fast dash to the train station with Aunt Mary). There was no train stop in west Toronto, the only stop was going much farther to the downtown station which meant an extra 2-3 hours for me to get home. The rules didn’t allow the train to make an unscheduled stop, however…… there was nothing in the rules that said the train couldn’t slow down to snail’s pace and by some miracle (thanks Uncle Andy) the train would slow down just at the right time allowing me to hop off and have a short walk home. The fireplace you helped build at the cottage is still going strong and bringing warmth to our bodies just as you brought warmth to our hearts. Brian, Natalya, Mykola, Kostya, and Amber
Coral and Steve MurphySo many wonderful memories of Uncle Andy. Loved our London visits arriving to huge welcome signs posted on the garsge door, tons of pool side antics and the mandatory departure photo which usually meant drinks on the hood of the car and many huge smiles. Recently saying goodbye to his sister, my Granny, was so hard but it is comforting to know they will now keep one another company. Our deepest condolences to all of you. XO
CONNIE MCCORMICKWE WERE SO VERY SAD TO LEARN OF ANDY'S PASSING...AND WE TREASURE OUR MANY MEMORIES OF THE FUN TIMES WE SPENT TOGETHER IN SARASOTA FLORIDA...AT U.S. THANKSGIVING DINNERS AND UKRAINIAN XMAS PARTIES....AS WELL.... I CAN ALSO REMEMBER THE HAPPY TIMES AT MY PARENT'S HOME IN WINNIPEG...WHEN ANDY AND MARY VISITED US...AND I ALSO REMEMBER SOME OF MY AIR CANADA LONDON LAYOVERS WHEN I WAS ABLE TO SPEND TIME WITH THE LUTY'S ON DENGATE...ONE TIME..I BROUGHT ALONG THE WHOLE AIR CANADA CREW...PILOTS AND FLT ATTENDANTS... IT WAS ALWAYS SO MUCH FUN TO SPEND TIME WITH THE LUTY FAMILY....ANDY WAS A VERY SPECIAL PERSON...AND WE FEEL HONORED TO HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHARE TIME WITH HIM...AND HIS WONDERFUL WIFE AND FAMILY....
Brett McCabeIf words described what I have to say about Gigi, then this would be the size of the Bible. Some of my earliest memories of Gigi were so vivid that I can even remember the dates. The second memory of him was February 4th, 2000. I woke up in bed and Baba and Gigi were there laying next to me. I had no idea what was going on until they told me that I was going to have a brother that day. Of course the earliest memory was earlier that year on January 1st, 2000 when Gigi can out of the condo bedroom in his makeshift New Years baby's outfit. Another funny memory we had was when Gigi took Ben and I for a quick walk around soon drive. We were supposed to be gone for 20 minutes because we need to leave with our mom, however we were gone for more than a hour. Turns out Gigi made a wrong turn and we got lost in the woods haha. Gigi had no idea where to go so he knocked on a random door and asked how to get back to his house. I also remember when I got my first tooth pulled from Gigi. He tied a string around my tooth, stood 8 feet away and then pulled hard. I'm pretty sure it took us 20 minutes to find the tooth because nobody knew where it went. He also tried to teach Ben and I how to play tennis at the condos tennis court, he would bring he yellow basket of balls and feed them to us. We would hit them back, but we mostly tried to hit them like baseballs and see how far we could hit them out of the court. Gigi was truly a example of a man that shows that hard work pays off in whatever you do, which if one of life's biggest lessons that I learned from him. Another lesson I learned how Gigi lived was distinguishing the importances of luxeries in life. He would always try to get the most out of everything he owned and didn't try to get anything new unless it was completely broken. He also was considerate and grateful for any gift that was given to him, whether it was a healthsouth shirt or a no name size 2E pair of shoes from Bealls outlet... he treated every gift with enthusiasm. I'm sure Mrs. Spivak would agree with this; One last trait about him that I'll remember is to always finish your food that is given to you or however much you take, and to never ever leave unfinished bread on your plate unless you feed it to the birds (not seagulls). For living many miles away during the summer and fall months, I was grateful to spend as much time as I did with him whenever we traveled to Canada or when Baba and Gigi were in Florida. I always liked having Sunday dinner at the condo or when baba and Gigi came over to our place for Sunday dinner. Getting to play cards with Gigi is something I'll always cherish. I remember back when I was first learning how to play that sometimes Gigi would get upset sometimes when I would throw the wrong card when we were partners. Whenever I play Euchre, I will always think of him. I like to think that on Gigi last hand of bid euchre in life, that he "went to the moon". I had the opportunity to speak with Gigi about half a hour before he passed. He was unable to respond but I knew he could hear me. What I said was how thankful I was to have him be a part of my life and how much of an influence he was on me. I thanked him for all that's he's given me wherher it was advice, knowledge, or an object. I finished by saying that it's going to be ok and that I loved him. We had a baseball game right after I finished the call and I had to go out onto the field with tears in my eyes. Whenever I start to cry, I think of the phrase "Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened". The reason is that I was fourtunate to know Gigi for 20 years of my life. He lived a long happy complete life which is something to be happy about. I don't think of Gigi much in his later years , but all of the happy years that I remember about him when he was still able to do what he loved. It was tough not to cry, but sometimes it's best for us to let our emotions out. I cried almost the whole Robert Q bus ride from London to Toronto after the funeral, luckily the driver was playing 70s music I've never heard of so he couldn't hear me. As I finish this with tears in my eyes, I hope to one day have to life accomplishments and impact people the way Gigi has so one day my grandson can say the same thing about me. He may have left this earth, but I know he will always be with me. Thank you Gigi for everything and I love you forever. Your grandson, Brett McCabe
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